Digital Ogam: Implementation and Implications; Guest blog by Adrian Doyle

We are grateful to Adrian Doyle for contributing a guest blog this month. He is the creator of the Würzburg Irish Glosses website (wurzburg.ie) and is currently completing a PhD researching Natural Language Processing techniques for Old Irish in NUIG. Adrian writes: The ogam script has existed for over one and a half thousand years.… Continue reading Digital Ogam: Implementation and Implications; Guest blog by Adrian Doyle

The use of Ogham in Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla: Guest Blog by Clara Scholz

We are grateful to our Erasmus+ student intern Clara Scholz for providing this month’s blog. Clara writes: Ogham inscriptions have slowly but surely made their way into several pieces of popular media. One of the most recent and widely recognized pieces the script appears in is the newest addition to the videogame universe of Assassin’s… Continue reading The use of Ogham in Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla: Guest Blog by Clara Scholz

Three Approaches to Digital Imaging

By Dr Megan Kasten, OG(H)AM’s UK Postdoctoral Researcher Last month, the OG(H)AM project digitally recorded two of the ogham stones and seven ogham-inscribed portable objects in the National Museum of Ireland’s collections with the help of Irish project partners, the Discovery Programme. The team included OG(H)AM Postdoc Researchers, Megan Kasten and Nora White, OG(H)AM intern… Continue reading Three Approaches to Digital Imaging

Recycled Ogham Stones

By Dr Nora White, OG(H)AM’s Irish Postdoctoral Researcher When we think of ogham stones, we imagine an ogham-inscribed pillar or standing stone in the landscape, possibly marking a burial or a territory boundary. However, a high percentage of our ogham stones were actually first found in secondary locations, rather than in their original position. Not… Continue reading Recycled Ogham Stones

The origins of manuscript ogam and medieval Irish grammatical tradition

By Deborah Hayden, OG(H)AM’s Co-Investigator Around the middle of the ninth century, an Irish scribe who was perhaps feeling a little the worse for wear after a long night of merrymaking jotted down the word LATHEIRT (‘excessive drunkenness’, ‘hangover’) in ogam across the upper margin of a page in his copy of Priscian’s Latin grammar.… Continue reading The origins of manuscript ogam and medieval Irish grammatical tradition

You say ogham, and I say Ogam

By David Stifter, OG(H)AM’s Irish Principal Investigator What is ogam? Ogam is the name of a singularly original writing system consisting of strokes and notches across a stem-line that had its heyday in Ireland and Britain in the early middle ages, but that continued in use for a much longer time, espe­cially in Scotland. In… Continue reading You say ogham, and I say Ogam

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