R. A. S. Macalister – A Life

By Katherine Forsyth, OG(H)AM’s UK Principal Investigator Hurrah! It’s International Day of Ogham! In celebrating Ogham’s special day, we also mark the 153rd anniversary of the birth of the founding father of modern ogham studies, R. A. S. Macalister—born on 8 July 1870. In this month’s blog we take a look at Macalister’s life. For… Continue reading R. A. S. Macalister – A Life

The Stone Corridor – ogham stones at University College Cork (Part 1)

Ogham stones in Stone Corridor (‘Rúin na gCloch / Stories in Stone’ exhibition), University College Cork. (images by author) By Dr Nora White, OG(H)AM’s Irish Postdoctoral Researcher The Stone Corridor at University College Cork (North Wing of UCC’s Main Quadrangle Building), is unique in having a large collection of carved stone (including ogham stones) on… Continue reading The Stone Corridor – ogham stones at University College Cork (Part 1)

Ogham characters in Amhrán na Mara ‘Song of the Sea’; Guest blog by Dr Sabine Ziegler

We are grateful to Dr Sabine Ziegler for contributing a guest blog this month. She is the author of an indispensable introduction to and dictionary of the Irish ogham inscriptions (Ziegler 1994). She is now working at the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften in München, Germany. Sabine writes: Song of the Sea is a 2014… Continue reading Ogham characters in Amhrán na Mara ‘Song of the Sea’; Guest blog by Dr Sabine Ziegler

3D and RTI: Shedding Light on Damaged Ogham

By Dr Megan Kasten, OG(H)AM’s UK Postdoctoral Researcher In March 2023’s Ogham of the month, I mentioned that OG(H)AM’s application of digital imaging techniques to the Bac Mhic Connain knife handle (S-INV-001; NMS X.GNB 134) has offered new insights into the damaged parts of the ogham inscription. Because this is one of only four known… Continue reading 3D and RTI: Shedding Light on Damaged Ogham

Ogam Script in Irish Medical Tradition

By Deborah Hayden, OG(H)AM’s Co-Investigator In a previous blog on this site, I noted that the use of ogam in early Irish manuscripts was closely associated with the development of texts on grammar and alphabets, subjects that would have formed a cornerstone of education for any medieval Irish scribe. By the late medieval and early… Continue reading Ogam Script in Irish Medical Tradition

What does the word ogam mean and where does the name come from?

By David Stifter, OG(H)AM’s Irish Principal Investigator In my blog in December 2021, I talked about the different ways of spelling and pronouncing the word Ogam or ogham. In this blog entry, I will resume this discussion of the word itself and I will look into what the word may originally have referred to, before… Continue reading What does the word ogam mean and where does the name come from?

‘Byrhtferth’s Ogam Signature’ and Oxford, St John’s College MS 17

By Deborah Hayden, OG(H)AM’s Co-Investigator As we move into a new year, it seems fitting that this January’s OG(H)AM project blog should be devoted to a manuscript source concerned with calendrical matters. The image below is of a page in Oxford, St John’s College MS 17, an early-twelfth-century collection of texts, tables, maps and diagrams… Continue reading ‘Byrhtferth’s Ogam Signature’ and Oxford, St John’s College MS 17

Ogam and Trees

By Deborah Hayden and David Stifter There is a popular belief that the names of the ogam letters derive from words for trees: indeed, a quick Google search will typically unearth numerous links to websites where the script system is referred to as the ‘Irish Tree Alphabet’, the ‘Celtic Tree Alphabet’ or similar. This association… Continue reading Ogam and Trees

In Search of Lost Ogham Biographies

By Dr Nora White, OG(H)AM’s Irish Postdoctoral Researcher Following the first recording of an ogham stone (at Emlagh East, Co. Kerry) by Edward Lhuyd in the early 1700s, the vast majority of Irish ogham stones were recognised and recorded in the 19th and 20th centuries, although an occasional new find does still occur. In many… Continue reading In Search of Lost Ogham Biographies

‘Selective Authenticity’: Ogham in Video Games and Tabletop RPGs

By Dr Megan Kasten, OG(H)AM’s UK Postdoctoral Researcher In our April blog, Clara Scholz introduced us to the use of ogham in gaming through an examination of the script’s appearance in Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla. Although AC:V is probably the most popular game to include ogham in its worldbuilding, it is not the first to do… Continue reading ‘Selective Authenticity’: Ogham in Video Games and Tabletop RPGs