Ogham in the British Museum

By Katherine Forsyth, OG(H)AM’s UK Principal Investigator Christmas came a little early last month when we were welcomed behind the scenes at the British Museum to record ogham-inscribed objects in its collection. Two are on public display and so some early starts were required to complete photography before the doors opened (it takes about two… Continue reading Ogham in the British Museum

The Periods of Ogam Usage

By David Stifter, Katherine Forsyth, Deborah Hayden, Nora White This is a revised excerpt from Stifter, White & Forsyth (2024: 218–221), which will appear in a volume edited by Alex Mullen and George Woudhuysen on 28 December this year (link here). In this article, we distinguish four more or less distinct periods of ogam usage… Continue reading The Periods of Ogam Usage

The Stone Corridor – ogham stones at University College Cork (Part 2)       

Ogham stones in Stone Corridor ('Rúin na gCloch / Stories in Stone' exhibition), University College Cork (images by author).

By Dr Nora White, OG(H)AM’s Irish Postdoctoral Researcher In Part 1 of this blog post, I presented the first twelve ogham stones in the collection: six collected in the early 19th century (originally housed in the Royal Cork Institution) and another six from a single souterrain in the townland of Knockshanawee (Cnoc Seanmhaí, barony of… Continue reading The Stone Corridor – ogham stones at University College Cork (Part 2)       

The Stone Corridor – ogham stones at University College Cork (Part 1)

Ogham stones in Stone Corridor (‘Rúin na gCloch / Stories in Stone’ exhibition), University College Cork. (images by author) By Dr Nora White, OG(H)AM’s Irish Postdoctoral Researcher The Stone Corridor at University College Cork (North Wing of UCC’s Main Quadrangle Building), is unique in having a large collection of carved stone (including ogham stones) on… Continue reading The Stone Corridor – ogham stones at University College Cork (Part 1)

Ogam and Trees

By Deborah Hayden and David Stifter There is a popular belief that the names of the ogam letters derive from words for trees: indeed, a quick Google search will typically unearth numerous links to websites where the script system is referred to as the ‘Irish Tree Alphabet’, the ‘Celtic Tree Alphabet’ or similar. This association… Continue reading Ogam and Trees

Happy Birthday, R. A. S. Macalister !

By Katherine Forsyth, OG(H)AM’s Scottish Principal Investigator Inspired by our runological cousins, who celebrate International Day of Runology on 14 December each year, we have decided to declare a global day of celebration for our own dear script. Following some discussion as to which would make the most suitable day, we have settled upon the… Continue reading Happy Birthday, R. A. S. Macalister !