‘Byrhtferth’s Ogam Signature’ and Oxford, St John’s College MS 17

By Deborah Hayden, OG(H)AM’s Co-Investigator As we move into a new year, it seems fitting that this January’s OG(H)AM project blog should be devoted to a manuscript source concerned with calendrical matters. The image below is of a page in Oxford, St John’s College MS 17, an early-twelfth-century collection of texts, tables, maps and diagrams… Continue reading ‘Byrhtferth’s Ogam Signature’ and Oxford, St John’s College MS 17

Ogam and Trees

By Deborah Hayden and David Stifter There is a popular belief that the names of the ogam letters derive from words for trees: indeed, a quick Google search will typically unearth numerous links to websites where the script system is referred to as the ‘Irish Tree Alphabet’, the ‘Celtic Tree Alphabet’ or similar. This association… Continue reading Ogam and Trees

In Search of Lost Ogham Biographies

By Dr Nora White, OG(H)AM’s Irish Postdoctoral Researcher Following the first recording of an ogham stone (at Emlagh East, Co. Kerry) by Edward Lhuyd in the early 1700s, the vast majority of Irish ogham stones were recognised and recorded in the 19th and 20th centuries, although an occasional new find does still occur. In many… Continue reading In Search of Lost Ogham Biographies

‘Selective Authenticity’: Ogham in Video Games and Tabletop RPGs

By Dr Megan Kasten, OG(H)AM’s UK Postdoctoral Researcher In our April blog, Clara Scholz introduced us to the use of ogham in gaming through an examination of the script’s appearance in Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla. Although AC:V is probably the most popular game to include ogham in its worldbuilding, it is not the first to do… Continue reading ‘Selective Authenticity’: Ogham in Video Games and Tabletop RPGs

Digital Ogam: Implementation and Implications; Guest blog by Adrian Doyle

We are grateful to Adrian Doyle for contributing a guest blog this month. He is the creator of the Würzburg Irish Glosses website (wurzburg.ie) and is currently completing a PhD researching Natural Language Processing techniques for Old Irish in NUIG. Adrian writes: The ogam script has existed for over one and a half thousand years.… Continue reading Digital Ogam: Implementation and Implications; Guest blog by Adrian Doyle

Three Approaches to Digital Imaging

By Dr Megan Kasten, OG(H)AM’s UK Postdoctoral Researcher Last month, the OG(H)AM project digitally recorded two of the ogham stones and seven ogham-inscribed portable objects in the National Museum of Ireland’s collections with the help of Irish project partners, the Discovery Programme. The team included OG(H)AM Postdoc Researchers, Megan Kasten and Nora White, OG(H)AM intern… Continue reading Three Approaches to Digital Imaging

The origins of manuscript ogam and medieval Irish grammatical tradition

By Deborah Hayden, OG(H)AM’s Co-Investigator Around the middle of the ninth century, an Irish scribe who was perhaps feeling a little the worse for wear after a long night of merrymaking jotted down the word LATHEIRT (‘excessive drunkenness’, ‘hangover’) in ogam across the upper margin of a page in his copy of Priscian’s Latin grammar.… Continue reading The origins of manuscript ogam and medieval Irish grammatical tradition