Medieval Manuscripts and ScribalStyles: Team OG(H)AM Hosts Artist Thomas Keyes 

By Deborah Hayden and David Stifter, OG(H)AM’s Irish Co-Investigator and Irish Principal Investigator In autumn 2023, the OG(H)AM team was awarded a major follow-on funding grant from the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council for the year-long Impact and Engagement project Ogham Palaeography+ (OPal+),  led by Prof. Katherine Forsyth (University of Glasgow). For one strand… Continue reading Medieval Manuscripts and ScribalStyles: Team OG(H)AM Hosts Artist Thomas Keyes 

The Periods of Ogam Usage

By David Stifter, Katherine Forsyth, Deborah Hayden, Nora White This is a revised excerpt from Stifter, White & Forsyth (2024: 218–221), which will appear in a volume edited by Alex Mullen and George Woudhuysen on 28 December this year (link here). In this article, we distinguish four more or less distinct periods of ogam usage… Continue reading The Periods of Ogam Usage

Digital Palaeography between Manuscripts and Epigraphy Workshop

By Nora White, Corinna Salomon, Patricia O Connor and Megan Kasten On 15 November, 2023, the ‘Digital Palaeography between Manuscripts and Epigraphy’ workshop took place at the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin. The aim of this hybrid workshop was to bring together interrelated projects working on palaeography, of both manuscript and epigraphic material, and to… Continue reading Digital Palaeography between Manuscripts and Epigraphy Workshop

Ogam script and cryptography in the Irish legal manuscript tradition; Guest blog by Dr Chantal Kobel

We are grateful to Dr Chantal Kobel for contributing a guest blog this month. She is a Bergin Fellow in the School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. Her main research interests centre on medieval Irish language, literature and manuscript culture, in particular the extant medieval Irish law manuscripts. In an earlier blog, Deborah… Continue reading Ogam script and cryptography in the Irish legal manuscript tradition; Guest blog by Dr Chantal Kobel

Ogam Script in Irish Medical Tradition

By Deborah Hayden, OG(H)AM’s Co-Investigator In a previous blog on this site, I noted that the use of ogam in early Irish manuscripts was closely associated with the development of texts on grammar and alphabets, subjects that would have formed a cornerstone of education for any medieval Irish scribe. By the late medieval and early… Continue reading Ogam Script in Irish Medical Tradition

What does the word ogam mean and where does the name come from?

By David Stifter, OG(H)AM’s Irish Principal Investigator In my blog in December 2021, I talked about the different ways of spelling and pronouncing the word Ogam or ogham. In this blog entry, I will resume this discussion of the word itself and I will look into what the word may originally have referred to, before… Continue reading What does the word ogam mean and where does the name come from?

‘Byrhtferth’s Ogam Signature’ and Oxford, St John’s College MS 17

By Deborah Hayden, OG(H)AM’s Co-Investigator As we move into a new year, it seems fitting that this January’s OG(H)AM project blog should be devoted to a manuscript source concerned with calendrical matters. The image below is of a page in Oxford, St John’s College MS 17, an early-twelfth-century collection of texts, tables, maps and diagrams… Continue reading ‘Byrhtferth’s Ogam Signature’ and Oxford, St John’s College MS 17

In Lebor Ogaim, ‘The Book of Ogam’

By Deborah Hayden, OG(H)AM’s Co-Investigator In my last blog post on this site I discussed some of the earliest attestations of manuscript ogam, as well as the relationship between this script and ideas about alphabets that are expressed in the earliest grammar of the Irish language, Auraicept na nÉces (‘The Scholars’ Primer’). This post picks up… Continue reading In Lebor Ogaim, ‘The Book of Ogam’

The origins of manuscript ogam and medieval Irish grammatical tradition

By Deborah Hayden, OG(H)AM’s Co-Investigator Around the middle of the ninth century, an Irish scribe who was perhaps feeling a little the worse for wear after a long night of merrymaking jotted down the word LATHEIRT (‘excessive drunkenness’, ‘hangover’) in ogam across the upper margin of a page in his copy of Priscian’s Latin grammar.… Continue reading The origins of manuscript ogam and medieval Irish grammatical tradition