Ogham in the British Museum

By Katherine Forsyth, OG(H)AM’s UK Principal Investigator Christmas came a little early last month when we were welcomed behind the scenes at the British Museum to record ogham-inscribed objects in its collection. Two are on public display and so some early starts were required to complete photography before the doors opened (it takes about two… Continue reading Ogham in the British Museum

The Periods of Ogam Usage

By David Stifter, Katherine Forsyth, Deborah Hayden, Nora White This is a revised excerpt from Stifter, White & Forsyth (2024: 218–221), which will appear in a volume edited by Alex Mullen and George Woudhuysen on 28 December this year (link here). In this article, we distinguish four more or less distinct periods of ogam usage… Continue reading The Periods of Ogam Usage

Digital Palaeography between Manuscripts and Epigraphy Workshop

By Nora White, Corinna Salomon, Patricia O Connor and Megan Kasten On 15 November, 2023, the ‘Digital Palaeography between Manuscripts and Epigraphy’ workshop took place at the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin. The aim of this hybrid workshop was to bring together interrelated projects working on palaeography, of both manuscript and epigraphic material, and to… Continue reading Digital Palaeography between Manuscripts and Epigraphy Workshop

The Stone Corridor – ogham stones at University College Cork (Part 2)       

Ogham stones in Stone Corridor ('Rúin na gCloch / Stories in Stone' exhibition), University College Cork (images by author).

By Dr Nora White, OG(H)AM’s Irish Postdoctoral Researcher In Part 1 of this blog post, I presented the first twelve ogham stones in the collection: six collected in the early 19th century (originally housed in the Royal Cork Institution) and another six from a single souterrain in the townland of Knockshanawee (Cnoc Seanmhaí, barony of… Continue reading The Stone Corridor – ogham stones at University College Cork (Part 2)       

In Search of Lost Ogham Biographies

By Dr Nora White, OG(H)AM’s Irish Postdoctoral Researcher Following the first recording of an ogham stone (at Emlagh East, Co. Kerry) by Edward Lhuyd in the early 1700s, the vast majority of Irish ogham stones were recognised and recorded in the 19th and 20th centuries, although an occasional new find does still occur. In many… Continue reading In Search of Lost Ogham Biographies